Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Trends Neurosci. 2016 May;39(5):277-89. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2016.02.005.

Toward Better Genetically Encoded Sensors of Membrane Potential.

Author information

1
Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
2
Center for Functional Connectomics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul, 136-791, Korea.
3
Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Center for Functional Connectomics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul, 136-791, Korea. Electronic address: lawrence.b.cohen@hotmail.com.
4
Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA.
5
Center for Functional Connectomics, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul, 136-791, Korea. Electronic address: bradley.baker19@gmail.com.

Abstract

Genetically encoded optical sensors of cell activity are powerful tools that can be targeted to specific cell types. This is especially important in neuroscience because individual brain regions can include a multitude of different cell types. Optical imaging allows for simultaneous recording from numerous neurons or brain regions. Optical signals of membrane potential are useful because membrane potential changes are a direct sign of both synaptic and action potentials. Here we describe recent improvements in the in vitro and in vivo signal size and kinetics of genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) and discuss their relationship to alternative sensors of neural activity.

KEYWORDS:

Ehud Isacoff; Thomas Knopfel; genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs); genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs)

PMID:
27130905
PMCID:
PMC4852096
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2016.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center