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Cell. 2016 Mar 10;164(6):1212-1225. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.02.041.

Hardwiring Stem Cell Communication through Tissue Structure.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA.
2
Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA; Department of Dermatology, Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA; Department of Cell Biology, Yale Stem Cell Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA; Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA. Electronic address: valentina.greco@yale.edu.
3
Department of Dermatology, Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA; Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510, USA. Electronic address: peggy.myung@yale.edu.

Abstract

Adult stem cells across diverse organs self-renew and differentiate to maintain tissue homeostasis. How stem cells receive input to preserve tissue structure and function largely relies on their communication with surrounding cellular and non-cellular elements. As such, how tissues are organized and patterned not only reflects organ function, but also inherently hardwires networks of communication between stem cells and their environment to direct tissue homeostasis and injury repair. This review highlights how different methods of stem cell communication reflect the unique organization and function of diverse tissues.

PMID:
26967287
PMCID:
PMC4805424
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2016.02.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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