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AIDS Behav. 2016 Mar;20(3):504-11. doi: 10.1007/s10461-015-1053-7.

Number of Drinks to "Feel a Buzz" by HIV Status and Viral Load in Men.

Author information

1
Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. kathleen.mcginnis3@va.gov.
2
Veterans Aging Cohort Study Coordinating Center, VA CT Healthcare System, 950 Campbell Ave, West Haven, CT, 06516, USA. kathleen.mcginnis3@va.gov.
3
Veterans Aging Cohort Study Coordinating Center, VA CT Healthcare System, 950 Campbell Ave, West Haven, CT, 06516, USA.
4
Division of General Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, USA.
6
Departments of Epidemiology and Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.
7
Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, USA.
8
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD, USA.
9
Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
10
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
11
Department of Psychology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, USA.

Abstract

The impact of HIV and its treatment on the effects of alcohol remain unclear. Blood alcohol concentrations have been noted to be higher in HIV infected individuals prior to antiretroviral initiation. Our goal was to compare number of drinks to "feel a buzz or high" among HIV infected and uninfected men, stratified by viral load (VL) suppression. Data includes 1478 HIV infected and 1170 uninfected men in the veterans aging cohort study who endorsed current drinking. Mean (SD) number of drinks to feel a buzz was 3.1 (1.7) overall. In multivariable analyses, HIV infected men reported a lower mean number of drinks to feel a buzz compared to uninfected men (coef = -14 for VL < 500; -34 for VL ≥ 500; p ≤ .05). Men with HIV, especially those with a detectable VL, reported fewer drinks to feel a buzz. Future research on the relationship between alcohol and HIV should consider the role of VL suppression.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol intoxication; Alcohol use; Alcohol-related disorders; Buzz; HIV

PMID:
26936030
PMCID:
PMC4780364
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-015-1053-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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