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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2016 Dec;1861(12 Pt B):2094-2103. doi: 10.1016/j.bbalip.2016.01.013. Epub 2016 Jan 26.

MicroRNAs as regulators of endothelial cell functions in cardiometabolic diseases.

Author information

1
Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism, Section of Comparative Medicine, Department of Pathology and the Vascular Biology and Therapeutics Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
2
Program in Integrative Cell Signaling and Neurobiology of Metabolism, Section of Comparative Medicine, Department of Pathology and the Vascular Biology and Therapeutics Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: yajaira.suarez@yale.edu.

Abstract

Endothelial cells (ECs) provide nutrients and oxygen essential for tissue homeostasis. Metabolic imbalances and other environmental stimuli, like cytokines or low shear stress, trigger endothelial inflammation, increase permeability, compromise vascular tone, promote cell proliferation, and ultimately cause cell death. These factors contribute to EC dysfunction, which is crucial in the development of cardiometabolic diseases. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that have important functions in the regulation of ECs. In the present review, we discuss the role of miRNAs in various aspects of EC pathology in cardiometabolic diseases like atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome, and in complication of those pathologies, like ischemia. We also discuss the potential therapeutic applications of miRNAs in promoting angiogenesis and neovascularization in tissues where the endothelium is damaged in different cardiometabolic diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MicroRNAs and lipid/energy metabolism and related diseases edited by Carlos Fernández-Hernando and Yajaira Suárez.

KEYWORDS:

Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular disease; Endothelial cells; Metabolic syndrome; MicroRNAs; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
26825686
PMCID:
PMC5039046
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbalip.2016.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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