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Prog Brain Res. 2016;224:203-23. doi: 10.1016/bs.pbr.2015.07.026. Epub 2015 Nov 4.

Genetic imaging consortium for addiction medicine: From neuroimaging to genes.

Author information

1
Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA. Electronic address: msmackey@uvm.edu.
2
Departments of Psychiatry and Psychology, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Hospital Clínic, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Psychiatry, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Psychiatry and MRC Unit on Anxiety & Stress Disorders, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
6
Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
7
Department of Psychosocial Research and Epidemiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
8
Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
10
Department of Psychiatry and MRC Unit on Anxiety & Stress Disorders, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Department of Psychiatry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
11
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
12
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA.
13
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
14
Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
15
School of Psychological Sciences, Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences and Monash Biomedical Imaging, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
16
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
17
Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Hospital Clínic, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
18
David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
19
VA San Diego Healthcare System and Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
20
Rotman Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
21
Department of Psychiatry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
22
Section on Brain Electrophysiology and Imaging, Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, USA.
23
Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
24
Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.
25
Intramural Research Program-Neuroimaging Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, MD, USA.
26
School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
27
Laureate Institute for Brain Research, Tulsa, OK, USA.
28
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charité Universitatsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.
29
QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
30
Department of Psychiatry, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
31
Department of Neurology, Imaging Genetics Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Marina del Rey, CA, USA.
32
Department of Psychiatry, Université de Montreal, CHU Ste Justine Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Abstract

Since the sample size of a typical neuroimaging study lacks sufficient statistical power to explore unknown genomic associations with brain phenotypes, several international genetic imaging consortia have been organized in recent years to pool data across sites. The challenges and achievements of these consortia are considered here with the goal of leveraging these resources to study addiction. The authors of this review have joined together to form an Addiction working group within the framework of the ENIGMA project, a meta-analytic approach to multisite genetic imaging data. Collectively, the Addiction working group possesses neuroimaging and genomic data obtained from over 10,000 subjects. The deadline for contributing data to the first round of analyses occurred at the beginning of May 2015. The studies performed on this data should significantly impact our understanding of the genetic and neurobiological basis of addiction.

KEYWORDS:

Addiction; ENIGMA; Genetic imaging; Neuroimaging

PMID:
26822360
PMCID:
PMC4820288
DOI:
10.1016/bs.pbr.2015.07.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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