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Int J Cardiol. 2016 Mar 15;207:269-76. doi: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.01.013. Epub 2016 Jan 6.

Impact of gender on infarct size, ST-segment resolution, myocardial blush and clinical outcomes after primary stenting for acute myocardial infarction: Substudy from the EMERALD trial.

Author information

1
Yale University Medical Center, New Haven, CT, United States.
2
Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.
3
Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, Brazil.
4
Columbia University Medical Center and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, NY, United States.
5
Department of Cardiology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, Japan.
6
Yale University Medical Center, New Haven, CT, United States. Electronic address: alexandra.lansky@yale.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Women with AMI may have worse outcomes than men. However, it is unclear if this is related to differences in treatment, treatment effect or gender specific factors. We sought to determine whether primary percutaneous intervention (PCI) has a differential impact on infarct size, myocardial perfusion and ST segment resolution in men and women with acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

METHODS:

A total of 501 AMI patients were prospectively enrolled in the EMERALD study and underwent PCI with or without distal protection. Post hoc gender subset analysis was performed.

RESULTS:

501 patients (108 women, 393 men) with ST-segment elevation AMI presenting within 6h underwent primary (or rescue) PCI with stenting and a distal protection device. Women were older, had more hypertension, less prior AMI, smaller BSA, and smaller vessel size, but had similar rates of diabetes (30% versus 20.2%, p=0.87), LAD infarct, and time-to-reperfusion compared to men. Women more frequently had complete ST-resolution (>70%) at 30days (72.8% versus 59.8%, p=0.02), and smaller infarct size compared to males (12.2±19.6% versus 18.4±18.5%, p=0.006). At 6months, TLR (6.9% versus 5.2%) and MACE (11.4% versus 10.3%) were similar for women and men.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite worse comorbidities, women with AMI treated with primary PCI with stenting showed similar early and midterm outcomes compared to men.

KEYWORDS:

Myocardial infarction; Outcomes; Primary percutaneous intervention; Women

PMID:
26808991
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijcard.2016.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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