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Cancer Treat Res. 2016;167:107-29. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-22539-5_4.

Melanoma: Clinical Presentations.

Author information

1
Departments of Dermatology and Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, USA.
2
Departments of Dermatology and Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, USA. harriet.kluger@yale.edu.

Abstract

The malignant cell in melanoma is the melanocyte. Because melanocytes are located in the basal layer of the epidermis, melanoma is most commonly seen on the skin. However, melanoma can also arise on mucosal surfaces such as the oral cavity, the upper gastrointestinal mucosa, the genital mucosa, as well as the uveal tract of the eye and leptomeninges. Melanomas tend to be pigmented but can also present as pink or red lesions. They can mimic benign or other malignant skin lesions. This chapter presents the spectrum of typical and less typical presentations of melanoma, as well as patterns of spread. It is divided into (1) cutaneous lesions; (2) patterns of regional spread, (3) non-cutaneous lesions; and (4) distant metastases.

KEYWORDS:

Atypical pigmented cutaneous lesions; Melanoma of unknown primary site; Non-cutaneous melanoma

PMID:
26601860
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-22539-5_4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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