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Cell Rep. 2015 Oct 27;13(4):746-759. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.09.028. Epub 2015 Oct 17.

Impaired LRP6-TCF7L2 Activity Enhances Smooth Muscle Cell Plasticity and Causes Coronary Artery Disease.

Author information

1
Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
2
Section of Comparative Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
3
Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: arya.mani@yale.edu.

Abstract

Mutations in Wnt-signaling coreceptor LRP6 have been linked to coronary artery disease (CAD) by unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that reduced LRP6 activity in LRP6(R611C) mice promotes loss of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation, leading to aortic medial hyperplasia. Carotid injury augmented these effects and led to partial to total vascular obstruction. LRP6(R611C) mice on high-fat diet displayed dramatic obstructive CAD and exhibited an accelerated atherosclerotic burden on LDLR knockout background. Mechanistically, impaired LRP6 activity leads to enhanced non-canonical Wnt signaling, culminating in diminished TCF7L2 and increased Sp1-dependent activation of PDGF signaling. Wnt3a administration to LRP6(R611C) mice improved LRP6 activity, led to TCF7L2-dependent VSMC differentiation, and rescued post-carotid-injury neointima formation. These findings demonstrate the critical role of intact Wnt signaling in the vessel wall, establish a causal link between impaired LRP6/TCF7L2 activities and arterial disease, and identify Wnt signaling as a therapeutic target against CAD.

PMID:
26489464
PMCID:
PMC4626307
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2015.09.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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