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ACS Med Chem Lett. 2015 Aug 31;6(10):1075-9. doi: 10.1021/acsmedchemlett.5b00254. eCollection 2015 Oct 8.

Potent Inhibitors Active against HIV Reverse Transcriptase with K101P, a Mutation Conferring Rilpivirine Resistance.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Yale University School of Medicine , New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8066, United States.
2
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore, Maryland 21205, United States.
3
Department of Chemistry, Yale University , New Haven, Connecticut 06530-8107, United States.
4
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore, Maryland 21205, United States ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute , Baltimore, Maryland 21205, United States.

Abstract

Catechol diether compounds have nanomolar antiviral and enzymatic activity against HIV with reverse transcriptase (RT) variants containing K101P, a mutation that confers high-level resistance to FDA-approved non-nucleoside inhibitors efavirenz and rilpivirine. Kinetic data suggests that RT (K101P) variants are as catalytically fit as wild-type and thus can potentially increase in the viral population as more antiviral regimens include efavirenz or rilpivirine. Comparison of wild-type structures and a new crystal structure of RT (K101P) in complex with a leading compound confirms that the K101P mutation is not a liability for the catechol diethers while suggesting that key interactions are lost with efavirenz and rilpivirine.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; mutations; non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors; resistance; reverse transcriptase

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