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AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2016 Feb;37(2):330-5. doi: 10.3174/ajnr.A4515. Epub 2015 Oct 8.

Evaluation for Blunt Cerebrovascular Injury: Review of the Literature and a Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

Author information

1
From the Departments of Diagnostic Radiology (A.M., X.W., V.B.K., C.C.M., H.P.F.) ajay.malhotra@yale.
2
From the Departments of Diagnostic Radiology (A.M., X.W., V.B.K., C.C.M., H.P.F.).
3
Neurology (J.S.) Neurosurgery (J.S., C.C.M.), Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
4
From the Departments of Diagnostic Radiology (A.M., X.W., V.B.K., C.C.M., H.P.F.) Neurosurgery (J.S., C.C.M.), Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Evaluation for blunt cerebrovascular injury has generated immense controversy with wide variations in recommendations regarding the need for evaluation and the optimal imaging technique. We review the literature and determine the most cost-effective strategy for evaluating blunt cerebrovascular injury in trauma patients.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A comprehensive literature review was performed with data extracted to create a decision-tree analysis for 5 different strategies: anticoagulation for high-risk (based on the Denver screening criteria) patients, selective DSA or CTA (only high-risk patients), and DSA or CTA for all trauma patients. The economic evaluation was based on a health care payer perspective during a 1-year horizon. Statistical analyses were performed. The cost-effectiveness was compared through 2 main indicators: the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio and net monetary benefit.

RESULTS:

Selective anticoagulation in high-risk patients was shown to be the most cost-effective strategy, with the lowest cost and greatest effectiveness (an average cost of $21.08 and average quality-adjusted life year of 0.7231). Selective CTA has comparable utility and only a slightly higher cost (an average cost of $48.84 and average quality-adjusted life year of 0.7229). DSA, whether performed selectively or for all patients, was not optimal from both the cost and utility perspectives. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated these results to be robust for a wide range of parameter values.

CONCLUSIONS:

Selective CTA in high-risk patients is the optimal and cost-effective imaging strategy. It remains the dominant strategy over DSA, even assuming a low CTA sensitivity and irrespective of the proportion of patients at high-risk and the incidence of blunt cerebrovascular injury in high-risk patients.

PMID:
26450540
DOI:
10.3174/ajnr.A4515
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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