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Mol Biol Cell. 2015 Dec 1;26(24):4401-11. doi: 10.1091/mbc.E14-09-1385. Epub 2015 Sep 30.

Dual pulse-chase microscopy reveals early divergence in the biosynthetic trafficking of the Na,K-ATPase and E-cadherin.

Author information

  • 1Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8026.
  • 2Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520-8026 michael.caplan@yale.edu).

Abstract

Recent evidence indicates that newly synthesized membrane proteins that share the same distributions in the plasma membranes of polarized epithelial cells can pursue a variety of distinct trafficking routes as they travel from the Golgi complex to their common destination at the cell surface. In most polarized epithelial cells, both the Na,K-ATPase and E-cadherin are localized to the basolateral domains of the plasma membrane. To examine the itineraries pursued by newly synthesized Na,K-ATPase and E-cadherin in polarized MDCK epithelial cells, we used the SNAP and CLIP labeling systems to fluorescently tag temporally defined cohorts of these proteins and observe their behaviors simultaneously as they traverse the secretory pathway. These experiments reveal that E-cadherin is delivered to the cell surface substantially faster than is the Na,K-ATPase. Furthermore, the surface delivery of newly synthesized E-cadherin to the plasma membrane was not prevented by the 19 °C temperature block that inhibits the trafficking of most proteins, including the Na,K-ATPase, out of the trans-Golgi network. Consistent with these distinct behaviors, populations of newly synthesized E-cadherin and Na,K-ATPase become separated from one another within the trans-Golgi network, suggesting that they are sorted into different carrier vesicles that mediate their post-Golgi trafficking.

PMID:
26424804
PMCID:
PMC4666135
DOI:
10.1091/mbc.E14-09-1385
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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