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Diabetes Care. 2015 Oct;38(10):1975-85. doi: 10.2337/dc15-1429.

Defining pathways for development of disease-modifying therapies in children with type 1 diabetes: a consensus report.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
2
American Diabetes Association, Alexandria, VA.
3
Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami, Miami, FL.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN.
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA.
6
Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Colorado, Denver, CO.
7
Department of Immunobiology, Yale University, New Haven, CT.
8
Division of Rheumatology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH.
9
Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
10
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.
11
Department of Pediatrics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
12
Department of Bioethics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
13
Diabetes Research Program, Benaroya Research Institute, Seattle, WA cjgreen@benaroyaresearch.org.

Abstract

Emerging data suggest that type 1 diabetes is a more aggressive disease in children than in adults, with important differences in pathophysiology and clinical course. Therefore, the efficacy of disease-modifying therapies may be different in the two populations. Understanding the developmental and regulatory pathways for type 1 diabetes-modifying therapies in children will enable industry, academia, funders, advocacy groups, and regulators to translate new science to clinical care. This consensus report characterizes the fundamental differences in type 1 diabetes between children and adults and proposes a thoughtful approach to better understand the development and regulatory pathways for type 1 diabetes therapies.

PMID:
26404927
PMCID:
PMC4876737
DOI:
10.2337/dc15-1429
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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