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AIDS Behav. 2016 Mar;20(3):679-86. doi: 10.1007/s10461-015-1197-5.

Trends in Any and High-Dose Opioid Analgesic Receipt Among Aging Patients With and Without HIV.

Author information

1
Internal Medicine, West Haven VA Medical Center, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Mail Stop 151B, 950 Campbell Avenue, West Haven, CT, 06516, USA. william.becker@yale.edu.
2
Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. william.becker@yale.edu.
3
Internal Medicine, West Haven VA Medical Center, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Mail Stop 151B, 950 Campbell Avenue, West Haven, CT, 06516, USA.
4
Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Psychology, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA.
6
Psychology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
7
Center for Health Services Research, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.
8
University of Pittsburgh and Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Abstract

Harms of opioid analgesics, especially high-dose therapy among individuals with comorbidities and older age, are increasingly recognized. However, trends in opioid receipt among HIV-infected patients are not well characterized. We examined trends, from 1999 to 2010, in any and high-dose (≥120 mg/day) opioid receipt among patients with and without HIV, by age strata, controlling for demographic and clinical correlates. Of 127,216 patients, 64 % received at least one opioid prescription. Opioid receipt increased substantially among HIV-infected and uninfected patients over the study; high-dose therapy was more prevalent among HIV-infected patients. Trends in high-dose receipt stratified by three age groups revealed an increasing trend in each age strata, higher among HIV-infected patients. Correlates of any opioid receipt included HIV, PTSD and major depression. Correlates of high-dose receipt included HIV, PTSD, major depression and drug use disorders. These findings suggest a need for appropriate balance of risks and benefits, especially as these populations age.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Analgesics; Chronic; Human immunodeficiency virus; Opioids; Pain

PMID:
26384973
PMCID:
PMC5006945
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-015-1197-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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