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Genetics. 2015 Nov;201(3):843-52. doi: 10.1534/genetics.115.180208. Epub 2015 Aug 28.

The Transgenic RNAi Project at Harvard Medical School: Resources and Validation.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
2
Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215.
3
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
4
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 TsingHua Fly Center, Beijing, 100084, China.
5
TsingHua Fly Center, Beijing, 100084, China.
6
Comparative Genomics Laboratory, National Institute of Genetics, Shizuoka 411-8540, Japan.
7
Department of Genetics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06510.
8
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Skirball Institute, Department of Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016.
9
CRUK Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 1TN, United Kingdom.
10
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Janelia Farm Research Institute ,Asburn, Virginia, 20147.
11
Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center Bloomington, Indiana, 47405.
12
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Invertebrate Genetics Laboratory, National Institute of Genetics, Shizuoka 411-8540, Japan.
13
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 perrimon@receptor.med.harvard.edu.

Abstract

To facilitate large-scale functional studies in Drosophila, the Drosophila Transgenic RNAi Project (TRiP) at Harvard Medical School (HMS) was established along with several goals: developing efficient vectors for RNAi that work in all tissues, generating a genome-scale collection of RNAi stocks with input from the community, distributing the lines as they are generated through existing stock centers, validating as many lines as possible using RT-qPCR and phenotypic analyses, and developing tools and web resources for identifying RNAi lines and retrieving existing information on their quality. With these goals in mind, here we describe in detail the various tools we developed and the status of the collection, which is currently composed of 11,491 lines and covering 71% of Drosophila genes. Data on the characterization of the lines either by RT-qPCR or phenotype is available on a dedicated website, the RNAi Stock Validation and Phenotypes Project (RSVP, http://www.flyrnai.org/RSVP.html), and stocks are available from three stock centers, the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center (United States), National Institute of Genetics (Japan), and TsingHua Fly Center (China).

KEYWORDS:

Drosophila; RNAi; functional genomics; phenotypes; screens

PMID:
26320097
PMCID:
PMC4649654
DOI:
10.1534/genetics.115.180208
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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