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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2015 Aug 14;9(8):e0003977. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003977. eCollection 2015.

Spatial and Temporal Clustering of Chikungunya Virus Transmission in Dominica.

Author information

1
Children's Hospital Informatics Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America; Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
2
Health Information Unit, Ministry of Health, Roseau, Commonwealth of Dominica.
3
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, United States of America.
4
Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Disease, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
5
Center for Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
6
Environmental Health Department, Ministry of Health, Roseau, Commonwealth of Dominica.
7
Children's Hospital Informatics Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America; Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Abstract

Using geo-referenced case data, we present spatial and spatio-temporal cluster analyses of the early spread of the 2013-2015 chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in Dominica, an island in the Caribbean. Spatial coordinates of the locations of the first 417 reported cases observed between December 15th, 2013 and March 11th, 2014, were captured using the Global Positioning System (GPS). We observed a preponderance of female cases, which has been reported for CHIKV outbreaks in other regions. We also noted statistically significant spatial and spatio-temporal clusters in highly populated areas and observed major clusters prior to implementation of intensive vector control programs suggesting early vector control measures, and education had an impact on the spread of the CHIKV epidemic in Dominica. A dynamical identification of clusters can lead to local assessment of risk and provide opportunities for targeted control efforts for nations experiencing CHIKV outbreaks.

PMID:
26274813
PMCID:
PMC4537218
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0003977
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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