Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2015 Aug 5;5:12757. doi: 10.1038/srep12757.

Arteriovenous Blood Metabolomics: A Readout of Intra-Tissue Metabostasis.

Author information

1
Center for Metabolomics and Mass Spectrometry, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, United States.
2
1] Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, MEM-180, La Jolla, California 92037, United States [2] Anticoagulation Services, Scripps Clinic and Scripps Green Hospital, 10666 North Torrey Pines Road, W207, La Jolla, California 92037, United States.
3
Department of Molecular and Experimental Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, MEM-180, La Jolla, California 92037, United States.
4
Anticoagulation Services, Scripps Clinic and Scripps Green Hospital, 10666 North Torrey Pines Road, W207, La Jolla, California 92037, United States.
5
Departments of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive, MC 0613, La Jolla, California 92037, United States.
6
Departments of Chemistry, Genetics, and Medicine, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States.
7
1] Center for Metabolomics and Mass Spectrometry, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, United States [2] Departments of Chemistry, Molecular and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, United States.

Abstract

The human circulatory system consists of arterial blood that delivers nutrients to tissues, and venous blood that removes the metabolic by-products. Although it is well established that arterial blood generally has higher concentrations of glucose and oxygen relative to venous blood, a comprehensive biochemical characterization of arteriovenous differences has not yet been reported. Here we apply cutting-edge, mass spectrometry-based metabolomic technologies to provide a global characterization of metabolites that vary in concentration between the arterial and venous blood of human patients. Global profiling of paired arterial and venous plasma from 20 healthy individuals, followed up by targeted analysis made it possible to measure subtle (<2 fold), yet highly statistically significant and physiologically important differences in water soluble human plasma metabolome. While we detected changes in lactic acid, alanine, glutamine, and glutamate as expected from skeletal muscle activity, a number of unanticipated metabolites were also determined to be significantly altered including Krebs cycle intermediates, amino acids that have not been previously implicated in transport, and a few oxidized fatty acids. This study provides the most comprehensive assessment of metabolic changes in the blood during circulation to date and suggests that such profiling approach may offer new insights into organ homeostasis and organ specific pathology.

PMID:
26244428
PMCID:
PMC4525490
DOI:
10.1038/srep12757
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center