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Nutrients. 2015 Jul 13;7(7):5646-63. doi: 10.3390/nu7075245.

Green Tea, Intermittent Sprinting Exercise, and Fat Oxidation.

Author information

1
Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Charles Darwin University, Ellengowan Drive, Casuarina, Northern Territory 0811, Australia. daniel.gahreman@cdu.edu.au.
2
School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, High Street, Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia. rose.wang589@gmail.com.
3
School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, High Street, Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia. y.boutcher@unsw.edu.au.
4
School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, High Street, Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales 2052, Australia. s.boutcher@unsw.edu.au.

Abstract

Fat oxidation has been shown to increase after short term green tea extract (GTE) ingestion and after one bout of intermittent sprinting exercise (ISE). Whether combining the two will result in greater fat oxidation after ISE is undetermined. The aim of the current study was to investigate the combined effect of short term GTE and a single session of ISE upon post-exercise fat oxidation. Fourteen women consumed three GTE or placebo capsules the day before and one capsule 90 min before a 20-min ISE cycling protocol followed by 1 h of resting recovery. Fat oxidation was calculated using indirect calorimetry. There was a significant increase in fat oxidation post-exercise compared to at rest in the placebo condition (p < 0.01). After GTE ingestion, however, at rest and post-exercise, fat oxidation was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than that after placebo. Plasma glycerol levels at rest and 15 min during post-exercise were significantly higher (p < 0.05) after GTE consumption compared to placebo. Compared to placebo, plasma catecholamines increased significantly after GTE consumption and 20 min after ISE (p < 0.05). Acute GTE ingestion significantly increased fat oxidation under resting and post-exercise conditions when compared to placebo.

KEYWORDS:

epinephrine; green tea; high-intensity exercise; norepinephrine; post exercise lipolysis

PMID:
26184298
PMCID:
PMC4517022
DOI:
10.3390/nu7075245
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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