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Ann Epidemiol. 2015 Oct;25(10):730-5.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.05.010. Epub 2015 Jun 5.

Dietary flavonoid intake and Barrett's esophagus in western Washington State.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Electronic address: jessica.petrick@unc.edu.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia.
3
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
4
Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston.
5
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Indiana University, Bloomington.
7
Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT.
8
Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Flavonoids, concentrated in fruits and vegetables, demonstrate in experimental studies chemopreventive properties in relation to Barrett's esophagus (BE), a precursor lesion for esophageal adenocarcinoma. One case-control investigation reported an inverse association between isoflavone intake and odds of BE, yet no epidemiologic study has considered other flavonoid classes, which are more commonly consumed by Americans.

METHODS:

We examined intake of total flavonoids, six flavonoid classes, and lignans among case-control study participants in western Washington State. Food frequency questionnaires were self-completed by BE cases with specialized intestinal metaplasia (n = 170) and matched controls (n = 183).

RESULTS:

In logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and energy intake, the odds ratio (OR) for specialized intestinal metaplasia BE associated with anthocyanidin intake was 0.49 (95% confidence interval: 0.30-0.80, for quartiles 2-4 combined vs. quartile 1), for which wine and fruit juice were major dietary sources. More moderate decreased ORs were noted for flavanones, flavonols, isoflavones, and lignans. A modest increased OR was observed for flavones, for which pizza was the main dietary source in our population.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings of an inverse association between anthocyanidins and odds of BE suggest that adequate dietary intake of these compounds may lower risk of this cancer precursor lesion.

KEYWORDS:

Barrett's esophagus; Diet; Epidemiologic studies; Flavonoids

PMID:
26169148
PMCID:
PMC4567908
DOI:
10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.05.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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