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J Vis Exp. 2015 Jun 15;(100):e52116. doi: 10.3791/52116.

fMRI Validation of fNIRS Measurements During a Naturalistic Task.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine; adam@adamnoah.com.
2
Department of Electronics and Bioinformatics, Meiji University.
3
Department of Histology and Neurobiology, Dokkyo Medical University School of Medicine.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine; Department of Neurobiology, Yale School of Medicine.

Abstract

We present a method to compare brain activity recorded with near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in a dance video game task to that recorded in a reduced version of the task using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging). Recently, it has been shown that fNIRS can accurately record functional brain activities equivalent to those concurrently recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging for classic psychophysical tasks and simple finger tapping paradigms. However, an often quoted benefit of fNIRS is that the technique allows for studying neural mechanisms of complex, naturalistic behaviors that are not possible using the constrained environment of fMRI. Our goal was to extend the findings of previous studies that have shown high correlation between concurrently recorded fNIRS and fMRI signals to compare neural recordings obtained in fMRI procedures to those separately obtained in naturalistic fNIRS experiments. Specifically, we developed a modified version of the dance video game Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) to be compatible with both fMRI and fNIRS imaging procedures. In this methodology we explain the modifications to the software and hardware for compatibility with each technique as well as the scanning and calibration procedures used to obtain representative results. The results of the study show a task-related increase in oxyhemoglobin in both modalities and demonstrate that it is possible to replicate the findings of fMRI using fNIRS in a naturalistic task. This technique represents a methodology to compare fMRI imaging paradigms which utilize a reduced-world environment to fNIRS in closer approximation to naturalistic, full-body activities and behaviors. Further development of this technique may apply to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, late states of dementia, or those with magnetic susceptibility which are contraindicated for fMRI scanning.

PMID:
26132365
PMCID:
PMC4544944
DOI:
10.3791/52116
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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