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J Am Geriatr Soc. 2015 Jul;63(7):1381-90. doi: 10.1111/jgs.13509. Epub 2015 Jun 26.

Effect of Structured Physical Activity on Sleep-Wake Behaviors in Sedentary Elderly Adults with Mobility Limitations.

Author information

1
Clinical Epidemiology Research Center, Veterans Affairs Connecticut, West Haven, Connecticut.
2
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
3
Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
4
Department of Medicine, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California.
5
Health Research and Policy Department, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California.
6
Sticht Center on Aging, School of Medicine, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
7
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.
8
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
9
Klein Buendel, Inc., Golden, Colorado.
10
Department of Epidemiology and Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
11
Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
12
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the effect of structured physical activity on sleep-wake behaviors in sedentary community-dwelling elderly adults with mobility limitations.

DESIGN:

Multicenter, randomized trial of moderate-intensity physical activity versus health education, with sleep-wake behaviors prespecified as a tertiary outcome over a planned intervention period ranging from 24 to 30 months.

SETTING:

Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Study.

PARTICIPANTS:

Community-dwelling persons aged 70 to 89 who were initially sedentary and had a Short Physical Performance Battery score less than 10 (N = 1,635).

MEASUREMENTS:

Sleep-wake behaviors were evaluated using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) (≥8 defined insomnia), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) (≥10 defined daytime drowsiness), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) (>5 defined poor sleep quality) administered at baseline and 6, 18, and 30 months.

RESULTS:

The randomized groups were similar in terms of baseline demographic variables, including mean age (79) and sex (67% female). Structured physical activity resulted in a significantly lower likelihood of having poor sleep quality (adjusted odds ratios (aOR) for PSQI >5 = 0.80, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.68-0.94), including fewer new cases (aOR for PSQI >5 = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.54-0.89), than health education but not in resolution of prevalent cases (aOR for PSQI ≤5 = 1.13, 95% CI = 0.90-1.43). No significant intervention effects were observed for the ISI or ESS.

CONCLUSION:

Structured physical activity resulted in a lower likelihood of developing poor sleep quality (PSQI >5) over the intervention period than health education but had no effect on prevalent cases of poor sleep quality or on sleep-wake behaviors evaluated using the ISI or ESS. These results suggest that the benefit of physical activity in this sample was preventive and limited to sleep-wake behaviors evaluated using the PSQI.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01072500.

KEYWORDS:

daytime drowsiness; insomnia; physical activity; poor sleep quality; sleep-wake behaviors

PMID:
26115386
PMCID:
PMC4892176
DOI:
10.1111/jgs.13509
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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