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Am J Sports Med. 2015 Aug;43(8):2012-7. doi: 10.1177/0363546515587738. Epub 2015 Jun 10.

Distal Biceps Tendon Ruptures: An Epidemiological Analysis Using a Large Population Database.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA mpkelly3@wisc.edu.
2
Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic Health System, Owatonna, Minnesota, USA.
3
Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA.
4
Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The incidence of distal biceps tendon ruptures was studied more than 10 years ago in a small patient cohort. Recent diagnostic advancements have improved the ability to detect this rare injury.

HYPOTHESIS:

The incidence of distal biceps tendon ruptures will be significantly greater than previously reported.

STUDY DESIGN:

Descriptive epidemiologic study.

METHODS:

A query of the PearlDiver Technologies national database containing public and private insurance patients was used to estimate the national incidence of distal biceps tendon ruptures in the United States. A retrospective chart review of our local population identified demographic groups and risk factors that increased likelihood of injury.

RESULTS:

The estimated national incidence of distal biceps tendon rupture was 2.55 per 100,000 patient-years. The local incidence was 5.35 per 100,000 patient-years. The mean and median ages of patients in our regional cohort were 46.3 and 46 years, respectively. Males composed the majority of the injured population (national 95%, regional 96%). Smoking and elevated body mass index were found to be associated with increased likelihood of injury, while diabetes mellitus showed no association.

CONCLUSION:

The incidence of distal biceps tendon ruptures in this study was higher than previously reported.

KEYWORDS:

distal biceps tendon; elbow; epidemiology; upper extremity

PMID:
26063401
DOI:
10.1177/0363546515587738
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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