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Mol Psychiatry. 2016 Apr;21(4):547-53. doi: 10.1038/mp.2015.63. Epub 2015 Jun 2.

Subcortical brain volume abnormalities in 2028 individuals with schizophrenia and 2540 healthy controls via the ENIGMA consortium.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA.
2
Imaging Genetics Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Olin Neuropsychiatric Research Center, Institute of Living, Hartford, CT, USA.
5
Norwegian Centre for Mental Disorders Research (NORMENT), KG Jebsen Centre for Psychosis Research, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
6
Department of Psychiatric Research, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
7
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
8
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
9
MMIL, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
10
Department of Cognitive Science, Neurosciences and Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.
11
Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
12
Center for Translational Research in Systems Neuroscience and Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Georg August University, Göttingen, Germany.
13
Cognitive Genetics and Therapy Group, School of Psychology, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
14
Neuropsychiatric Genetics research group, Department of Psychiatry and Trinity College Institute of Psychiatry, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland.
15
Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
16
Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
17
University Medical Center, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
18
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
19
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
20
San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA.
21
Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
22
Translational Developmental Neuroscience Section, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Technische Universität, Dresden, Germany.
23
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
24
MGH/MIT/HMS Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA.
25
Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
26
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
27
Advanced Biomedical Informatics Group, LLC, Iowa City, IA, USA.
28
The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.
29
Minneapolis VA Healthcare System & Department of Psychiatry, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN, USA.
30
Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
31
Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
32
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla, School of Medicine, University of Cantabria-IDIVAL, Santander, Spain.
33
CIBERSAM, Centro Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, Madrid, Spain.
34
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
35
Department of Radiology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
36
Division of Psychiatry, University of Edinburgh Medical School, Edinburgh, UK.
37
Molecular Research Center for Children's Mental Development, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan.
38
Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

The profile of brain structural abnormalities in schizophrenia is still not fully understood, despite decades of research using brain scans. To validate a prospective meta-analysis approach to analyzing multicenter neuroimaging data, we analyzed brain MRI scans from 2028 schizophrenia patients and 2540 healthy controls, assessed with standardized methods at 15 centers worldwide. We identified subcortical brain volumes that differentiated patients from controls, and ranked them according to their effect sizes. Compared with healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia had smaller hippocampus (Cohen's d=-0.46), amygdala (d=-0.31), thalamus (d=-0.31), accumbens (d=-0.25) and intracranial volumes (d=-0.12), as well as larger pallidum (d=0.21) and lateral ventricle volumes (d=0.37). Putamen and pallidum volume augmentations were positively associated with duration of illness and hippocampal deficits scaled with the proportion of unmedicated patients. Worldwide cooperative analyses of brain imaging data support a profile of subcortical abnormalities in schizophrenia, which is consistent with that based on traditional meta-analytic approaches. This first ENIGMA Schizophrenia Working Group study validates that collaborative data analyses can readily be used across brain phenotypes and disorders and encourages analysis and data sharing efforts to further our understanding of severe mental illness.

PMID:
26033243
PMCID:
PMC4668237
DOI:
10.1038/mp.2015.63
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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