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Stem Cell Reports. 2015 Jun 9;4(6):961-6. doi: 10.1016/j.stemcr.2015.05.001. Epub 2015 May 28.

The Dynamic Duo: Niche/Stem Cell Interdependency.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA.
2
Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Department of Dermatology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Yale Stem Cell Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; Yale Cancer Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. Electronic address: valentina.greco@yale.edu.

Abstract

Most tissues in our bodies undergo constant cellular turnover. This process requires a dynamic balance between cell production and elimination. Stem cells have been shown in many of these tissues to be the major source of new cells. However, despite the tremendous advances made, it still remains unclear how stem cell behavior and activity are regulated in vivo. Furthermore, we lack basic understanding for the mechanisms that coordinate niche/stem cell interactions to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. Our lab has established a novel imaging approach in live mice using the skin as a model system to investigate these fundamental processes in both physiological and pathological settings such as cancer, with the goal of understanding how tissues successfully orchestrate tissue regeneration throughout the lifetime of an organism.

PMID:
26028534
PMCID:
PMC4471832
DOI:
10.1016/j.stemcr.2015.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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