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Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2015 Jun;29(2):357-70. doi: 10.1016/j.idc.2015.02.008.

Babesiosis.

Author information

1
Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, 800 Washington Street Box #041, Boston, MA 02111, USA.
2
Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology, Columbia University, 1200 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027, USA.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, 15 York Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, 60 College Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Departments of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Yale School of Medicine, 15 York Street, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: peter.krause@yale.edu.

Abstract

Babesiosis is caused by intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites that are transmitted by ticks, or less commonly through blood transfusion or transplacentally. Human babesiosis was first recognized in a splenectomized patient in Europe but most cases have been reported from the northeastern and upper midwestern United States in people with an intact spleen and no history of immune impairment. Cases are reported in Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, and South America. Babesiosis shares many clinical features with malaria and can be fatal, particularly in the elderly and the immunocompromised.

KEYWORDS:

Apicomplexa; Babesia microti; Babesiosis; Erythrocyte; Protozoan; Tick; Transfusion

PMID:
25999229
PMCID:
PMC4458703
DOI:
10.1016/j.idc.2015.02.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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