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Matern Child Health J. 2015 Oct;19(10):2261-71. doi: 10.1007/s10995-015-1745-7.

Gestational Weight Gain and Health Outcomes 18 Years Later in Urban Black Women.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, Yale University, P. O. Box 27399, West Haven, CT, 06516-7399, USA. margaret.holland@yale.edu.
2
School of Nursing, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with higher body mass index (BMI) later in life. Increased BMI is associated with health problems, but there is limited evidence linking GWG directly to later health in black women. We examined the association between GWG and health conditions 18 years after a first birth.

METHODS:

This study was a secondary data analysis of 467 urban black women, enrolled during pregnancy (1990-1991). GWG was the difference between self-reported pre-pregnancy weight and measured weight at delivery. Hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and self-reported health were assessed with self-report and measurements of blood pressure, height, and weight, approximately 18 years after first childbirth.

RESULTS:

Higher pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with increased probability of each health condition. Higher GWG was associated with hypertension for women with a pre-pregnancy BMI under 21.3 kg/m(2) (P < .05) and obesity for women with a pre-pregnancy BMI under 25.9 kg/m(2) (P < .05). Diabetes and poor health were not associated with GWG.

CONCLUSIONS:

GWG may impact a mother's hypertension and obesity status 18 years after childbirth for underweight and normal weight women.

KEYWORDS:

Body mass index; Diabetes mellitus, type 2; Health outcomes; Health status; Hypertension; Obesity; Pregnancy; Weight gain

PMID:
25994417
PMCID:
PMC5538784
DOI:
10.1007/s10995-015-1745-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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