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Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2015 Oct;23(10):2950-9. doi: 10.1007/s00167-015-3629-1. Epub 2015 May 10.

Clinically relevant anatomy and what anatomic reconstruction means.

Author information

1
The Steadman Clinic, 181 W. Meadow Drive, Suite 400, Vail, CO, 81657, USA. drlaprade@sprivail.org.
2
Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO, USA. drlaprade@sprivail.org.
3
Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO, USA.
4
2nd Orthopaedics and Traumatologic Clinic, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna, Italy.
5
Kantonsspital Baselland-Bruderholz, Basel, Switzerland.
6
University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
7
Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Oslo, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Within the past 20 years, knee ligament injuries have been increasingly reported in the literature to be treated with anatomic reconstructions over soft tissue advancements or sling-type procedures to recreate the native anatomy and restore knee function. Historically, early clinician scientists published on the qualitative anatomy of the knee, which provided a foundation for the initial knee biomechanical studies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Similarly, the work of early sports medicine orthopaedic clinician scientists in the late twentieth century formed the basis for the quantitative anatomic and functional robotic biomechanical studies found currently in the sports medicine orthopaedic literature. The development of an anatomic reconstruction first requires an appreciation of the quantitative anatomy and function of each major stabilizing component of the knee.

PURPOSE:

This paper provides an overview of the initial qualitative anatomic studies from which the initial knee ligament surgeries were based and expands to recent detailed quantitative studies of the major knee ligaments and the renewed recent focus on anatomic surgical reconstructions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Anatomic repairs and reconstructions of the anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and posterolateral corner attempt to restore knee function by rebuilding or restoring the native anatomy. The basis of anatomic reconstruction techniques is a detailed understanding of quantitative knee anatomy. Additionally, an appreciation of the function of each component is necessary to ensure surgical success.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

V.

KEYWORDS:

Anatomic reconstruction; Anterior cruciate ligament; Complex knee instability; Medial collateral ligament; Posterior cruciate ligament; Posterolateral corner

PMID:
25957611
DOI:
10.1007/s00167-015-3629-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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