Format

Send to

Choose Destination
F1000Prime Rep. 2015 Mar 3;7:26. doi: 10.12703/P7-26. eCollection 2015.

Angiogenesis versus arteriogenesis: neuropilin 1 modulation of VEGF signaling.

Author information

1
Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.
2
Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06520 USA ; Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.

Abstract

In development and disease, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates the expansion of the vascular tree. In response to hypoxia, VEGF promotes new capillary formation through the process of angiogenesis by inducing endothelial cell sprouting, proliferation, and migration. Wound healing, tissue regeneration, and tumor growth depend on angiogenesis for adequate nutrient and oxygen delivery. Under different conditions, VEGF promotes arterial growth, modulates lumen expansion, and induces collateral vessel formation, events collectively referred to as arteriogenesis. Induction of arteriogenesis after cardiac or cerebral arterial occlusion can reduce ischemia and improve disease outcome. Endothelial VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling governs both processes. However, modulation of downstream VEGF signaling effectors, such as extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, differs in order to achieve angiogenic versus arteriogenic outcomes. Recent reports show that neuropilin 1 (NRP1), a VEGF receptor, can instill VEGF signaling outcomes that specifically regulate either angiogenesis or arteriogenesis. Here, we discuss how NRP1 functions as a VEGFR2 co-receptor in angiogenesis and a modulator of VEGFR2 trafficking in arteriogenesis. The unique role played by neuropilin in different endothelial processes makes it an exciting therapeutic target to specifically enhance angiogenesis or arteriogenesis in disease settings.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Faculty of 1000 Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center