Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Pediatr. 2015 May;166(5):1265-1269.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.02.036.

Body mass index changes in youth in the first year after type 1 diabetes diagnosis.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
2
Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, FL.
3
Jaeb Center for Health Research, Tampa, FL. Electronic address: pdc@jaeb.org.
4
Pediatric Endocrinology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
5
Pediatric Endocrinology, Yale University, New Haven, CT.
6
Pediatric Endocrinology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.
8
Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; Child Health Evaluation and Research Unit, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To describe changes in weight and body mass index (BMI) during the first year following diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and associations with demographic and clinical characteristics.

STUDY DESIGN:

The Pediatric Diabetes Consortium includes 7 US centers with prospective longitudinal data from initial T1D diagnosis. This analysis includes 530 youth with diabetes duration of ≥1 year and measures of BMI at 3 and 12 months after diagnosis. BMI trajectory of participants and relationships between the change in BMI z-score from baseline (3 months) to 12 months with demographic characteristics, hemoglobin A1c at baseline, and insulin delivery mode at baseline were evaluated.

RESULTS:

As a group, BMI z-scores increased sharply from diagnosis for 1-3 months but remained relatively stable from +0.51 at 3 months to +0.48 at 12 months. Children aged 2-<5 years experienced a significant positive change in BMI z-score between 3 and 12 months, and there was a similar trend among girls that did not reach statistical significance. No significant differences were found for race, socioeconomic status, or insulin delivery mode.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest that increased BMI during the first year of treatment of most youth with T1D reflects regain of weight lost before diagnosis. There is, however, a propensity toward additional weight gain in younger children and girls.

PMID:
25919735
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2015.02.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center