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Epidemics. 2015 Mar;10:21-5. doi: 10.1016/j.epidem.2014.09.005. Epub 2014 Sep 28.

Nine challenges in incorporating the dynamics of behaviour in infectious diseases models.

Author information

1
Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK. Electronic address: sebastian.funk@lshtm.ac.uk.
2
Department of Biology, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA; Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
3
Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada.
4
Centre for the Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK.
5
School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
6
Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA, UK.

Abstract

Traditionally, the spread of infectious diseases in human populations has been modelled with static parameters. These parameters, however, can change when individuals change their behaviour. If these changes are themselves influenced by the disease dynamics, there is scope for mechanistic models of behaviour to improve our understanding of this interaction. Here, we present challenges in modelling changes in behaviour relating to disease dynamics, specifically: how to incorporate behavioural changes in models of infectious disease dynamics, how to inform measurement of relevant behaviour to parameterise such models, and how to determine the impact of behavioural changes on observed disease dynamics.

KEYWORDS:

Behaviour; Infectious disease dynamics; Model; Movement and travel; Real-time data collection; Reporting

PMID:
25843377
DOI:
10.1016/j.epidem.2014.09.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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