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J Adv Nurs. 2015 Aug;71(8):1914-25. doi: 10.1111/jan.12645. Epub 2015 Mar 5.

Revising the American dream: how Asian immigrants adjust after an HIV diagnosis.

Author information

1
School of Nursing, Yale University, Orange, Connecticut, USA.
2
School of Nursing, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
4
School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry and Neurobiology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
6
Department of Health Promotion and Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan.
7
School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
8
APICHA Community Health Center, New York, New York, USA.
9
HIV/AIDS Service, Chinese-American Planning Council Inc, New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

We explored how acculturation and self-actualization affect depression in the HIV-positive Asians and Pacific Islanders immigrant population.

BACKGROUND:

Asians and Pacific Islanders are among the fastest growing minority groups in the USA. Asians and Pacific Islanders are the only racial/ethnic group to show a significant increase in HIV diagnosis rate.

DESIGN:

A mixed-methods study was conducted.

METHODS:

Thirty in-depth interviews were conducted with HIV-positive Asians and Pacific Islanders in San Francisco and New York. Additionally, cross-sectional audio computer-assisted self-interviews were conducted with a sample of 50 HIV-positive Asians and Pacific Islanders. Content analysis was used to analyse the in-depth interviews. Also, descriptive, bivariate statistics and multivariable regression analysis was used to estimate the associations among depression, acculturation and self-actualization. The study took place from January-June 2013.

DISCUSSION:

Major themes were extracted from the interview data, including self-actualization, acculturation and depression. The participants were then divided into three acculturation levels correlating to their varying levels of self-actualization. For those with low acculturation, there was a large discrepancy in the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores between those who had totally lost their self-actualization and those who believed they could still achieve their 'American dreams'. Among those who were less acculturated, there was a significant difference in depression scores between those who felt they had totally lost their ability to self-actualize and those who still believed they could 'make their dreams come true.'

CONCLUSION:

Acculturation levels influence depression and self-actualization in the HIV-positive Asians and Pacific Islanders population. Lower acculturated Asian Americans achieved a lower degree of self-actualization and suffered from depression. Future interventions should focus on enhancing acculturation and reducing depression to achieve self-actualization.

KEYWORDS:

American dream; Asian; HIV; acculturation; depression; immigrants; nursing; self-actualization; stress

PMID:
25740206
PMCID:
PMC4503482
DOI:
10.1111/jan.12645
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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