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J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2015 May;70(5):641-6. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv003. Epub 2015 Feb 13.

The MAT-sf: identifying risk for major mobility disability.

Collaborators (153)

Pahor M, Guralnik JM, Leeuwenburgh C, Caudle C, Crump L, Holmes L, Lee J, Lu CJ, Miller ME, Espeland MA, Ambrosius WT, Applegate W, Beavers DP, Byington RP, Cook D, Furberg CD, Harvin LN, Henkin L, Hepler J, Hsu FC, Lovato L, Roberson W, Rushing J, Rushing S, Stowe CL, Walkup MP, Hire D, Rejeski WJ, Katula JA, Brubaker PH, Mihalko SL, Jennings JM, Hadley EC, Romashkan S, Patel KV, Bonds D, McDermott MM, Spring B, Hauser J, Kerwin D, Domanchuk K, Graff R, Rego A, Church TS, Blair SN, Myers VH, Monce R, Britt NE, Harris MN, McGucken AP, Rodarte R, Millet HK, Tudor-Locke C, Butitta BP, Donatto SG, Cocreham SH, King AC, Castro CM, Haskell WL, Stafford RS, Pruitt LA, Berra K, Yank V, Fielding RA, Nelson ME, Folta SC, Phillips EM, Liu CK, McDavitt EC, Reid KF, Kirn DR, Pasha EP, Kim WS, Beard VE, Tsiroyannis EX, Hau C, Manini TM, Pahor M, Anton SD, Nayfield S, Buford TW, Marsiske M, Sandesara BD, Knaggs JD, Lorow MS, Marena WC, Korytov I, Morris HL, Fitch M, Singletary FF, Causer J, Radcliff KA, Newman AB, Studenski SA, Goodpaster BH, Glynn NW, Lopez O, Nadkarni NK, Williams K, Newman MA, Grove G, Bonk JT, Rush J, Kost P, Ives DG, Kritchevsky SB, Marsh AP, Brinkley TE, Demons JS, Sink KM, Kennedy K, Shertzer-Skinner R, Wrights A, Fries R, Barr D, Gill TM, Axtell RS, Kashaf SS, de Rekeneire N, McGloin JM, Wu KC, Shepard DM, Fennelly B, Iannone LP, Mautner R, Barnett TS, Halpin SN, Brennan MJ, Bugaj JA, Zenoni MA, Mignosa BM, Williamson J, Sink KM, Hendrie HC, Rapp SR, Verghese J, Woolard N, Espeland M, Jennings J, Wilson VK, Pepine CJ, Ariet M, Handberg E, Deluca D, Hill J, Szady A, Chupp GL, Flynn GM, Gill TM, Hankinson JL, Vaz Fragoso CA, Groessl EJ, Kaplan RM.

Author information

1
Department of Health & Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. rejeski@wfu.edu.
2
Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore.
4
Department of Health Research and Policy and the Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, California.
5
Department of Aging & Geriatric Research, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville.
6
Department of Health & Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina.
7
Department of Internal Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois.
8
Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts.
9
Department of Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
10
Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
11
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The assessment of mobility is essential to both aging research and clinical geriatric practice. A newly developed self-report measure of mobility, the mobility assessment tool-short form (MAT-sf), uses video animations as an innovative method to improve measurement accuracy/precision. The primary aim of the current study was to evaluate whether MAT-sf scores can be used to identify risk for major mobility disability (MMD).

METHODS:

This article is based on data collected from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders study and involved 1,574 older adults between the ages of 70-89. The MAT-sf was administered at baseline; MMD, operationalized as failure to complete the 400-m walk ≤ 15 minutes, was evaluated at 6-month intervals across a period of 42 months. The outcome of interest was the first occurrence of MMD or incident MMD.

RESULTS:

After controlling for age, sex, clinic site, and treatment arm, baseline MAT-sf scores were found to be effective in identifying risk for MMD (p < .0001). Partitioning the MAT-sf into four groups revealed that persons with scores <40, 40-49, 50-59, and 60+ had failure rates across 42 months of follow-up of 66%, 52%, 35%, and 22%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The MAT-sf is a quick and efficient way of identifying older adults at risk for MMD. It could be used to clinically identify older adults that are in need of intervention for MMD and provides a simple means for monitoring the status of patients' mobility, an important dimension of functional health.

KEYWORDS:

Geriatric assessment; LIFE study; MAT-sf; Mobility disability; Physical function.

PMID:
25680917
PMCID:
PMC4447779
DOI:
10.1093/gerona/glv003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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