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PLoS Med. 2014 Dec 30;11(12):e1001774. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001774. eCollection 2014 Dec.

Efficacy of neonatal HBV vaccination on liver cancer and other liver diseases over 30-year follow-up of the Qidong hepatitis B intervention study: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
State Key Lab of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute/Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.
2
Qidong Liver Cancer Institute, Qidong, Jiangsu Province, China.
3
National Office for Cancer Prevention and Control, Cancer Institute/Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
4
Qidong Liver Cancer Institute, Qidong, Jiangsu Province, China; National Office for Cancer Prevention and Control, Cancer Institute/Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven Connecticut, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neonatal hepatitis B vaccination has been implemented worldwide to prevent hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. Its long-term protective efficacy on primary liver cancer (PLC) and other liver diseases has not been fully examined.

METHODS AND FINDINGS:

The Qidong Hepatitis B Intervention Study, a population-based, cluster randomized, controlled trial between 1985 and 1990 in Qidong, China, included 39,292 newborns who were randomly assigned to the vaccination group in which 38,366 participants completed the HBV vaccination series and 34,441 newborns who were randomly assigned to the control group in which the participants received neither a vaccine nor a placebo. However, 23,368 (67.8%) participants in the control group received catch-up vaccination at age 10-14 years. By December 2013, a total of 3,895 (10.2%) in the vaccination group and 3,898 (11.3%) in the control group were lost to follow-up. Information on PLC incidence and liver disease mortality were collected through linkage of all remaining cohort members to a well-established population-based tumor registry until December 31, 2013. Two cross-sectional surveys on HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) seroprevalence were conducted in 1996-2000 and 2008-2012. The participation rates of the two surveys were 57.5% (21,770) and 50.7% (17,204) in the vaccination group and 36.3% (12,184) and 58.6% (17,395) in the control group, respectively. Using intention-to-treat analysis, we found that the incidence rate of PLC and the mortality rates of severe end-stage liver diseases and infant fulminant hepatitis were significantly lower in the vaccination group than the control group with efficacies of 84% (95% CI 23%-97%), 70% (95% CI 15%-89%), and 69% (95% CI 34%-85%), respectively. The estimated efficacy of catch-up vaccination on HBsAg seroprevalence in early adulthood was 21% (95% CI 10%-30%), substantially weaker than that of the neonatal vaccination (72%, 95% CI 68%-75%). Receiving a booster at age 10-14 years decreased HBsAg seroprevalence if participants were born to HBsAg-positive mothers (hazard ratio [HR]  = 0.68, 95% CI 0.47-0.97). Limitations to consider in interpreting the study results include the small number of individuals with PLC, participants lost to follow-up, and the large proportion of participants who did not provide serum samples at follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

Neonatal HBV vaccination was found to significantly decrease HBsAg seroprevalence in childhood through young adulthood and subsequently reduce the risk of PLC and other liver diseases in young adults in rural China. The findings underscore the importance of neonatal HBV vaccination. Our results also suggest that an adolescence booster should be considered in individuals born to HBsAg-positive mothers and who have completed the HBV neonatal vaccination series. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

PMID:
25549238
PMCID:
PMC4280122
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pmed.1001774
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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