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Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015 Feb;24(2):459-65. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1112. Epub 2014 Dec 9.

A prospective follow-up study of the relationship between C-reactive protein and human cancer risk in the Chinese Kailuan Female Cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, Kailuan General Hospital, Tangshan, China.
2
Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.
3
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut.
4
Health Department of Kailuan (group), Tangshan, China.
5
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. tongzhang.zheng@yale.edu prof.hejie@263.net.
6
Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, China. tongzhang.zheng@yale.edu prof.hejie@263.net.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

C-reactive protein (CRP) has been associated with cancer risk in some prospective studies. However, the associations have not been entirely consistent and have not been evaluated in Chinese females. We conducted a large population-based cohort study to investigate whether elevated levels of CRP at baseline are associated with an increased risk of cancer among Chinese females.

METHODS:

A total of 19,437 women from the Chinese Kailuan Female Cohort were enrolled in the study in July 2006. Levels of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) were tested at baseline for all subjects. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate the association between levels of hsCRP and risk of all cancers, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and other cancers.

RESULTS:

By December 31, 2011, a total of 322 incident cancer cases accrued. Compared with women with lower hsCRP levels (<1 mg/L), women with higher hsCRP (>3 mg/L) had a significantly increased risk of all incident cancers [HR, 1.62; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 1.23-2.14; P(trend) = 0.001] and breast cancer (HR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.01-2.97; P(trend) = 0.047). The significant association between hsCRP levels and breast cancer risk was apparent among younger women (<50 years; HR, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.18-6.48).

CONCLUSION:

Elevated levels of hsCRP at baseline may be associated with an increased risk of cancer, especially breast cancer, and particularly in younger Chinese women.

IMPACT:

Our findings provide additional evidence for a role of inflammation in carcinogenesis and suggest that CRP may be a potentially useful biomarker of cancer risk in this population.

PMID:
25490990
PMCID:
PMC4843781
DOI:
10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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