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Cell Rep. 2014 Oct 23;9(2):417-24. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.09.034. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Antivirulence properties of an antifreeze protein.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. Electronic address: martin.heisig@yale.edu.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
4
Department of Genetics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
5
Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA.
6
Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
7
Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD 20815, USA. Electronic address: erol.fikrig@yale.edu.

Erratum in

  • Cell Rep. 2014 Dec 24;9(6):2344.

Abstract

As microbial drug-resistance increases, there is a critical need for new classes of compounds to combat infectious diseases. The Ixodes scapularis tick antifreeze glycoprotein, IAFGP, functions as an antivirulence agent against diverse bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Recombinant IAFGP and a peptide, P1, derived from this protein bind to microbes and alter biofilm formation. Transgenic iafgp-expressing flies and mice challenged with bacteria, as well as wild-type animals administered P1, were resistant to infection, septic shock, or biofilm development on implanted catheter tubing. These data show that an antifreeze protein facilitates host control of bacterial infections and suggest therapeutic strategies for countering pathogens.

PMID:
25373896
PMCID:
PMC4223805
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2014.09.034
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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