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Nat Neurosci. 2014 Nov;17(11):1518-27. doi: 10.1038/nn.3815. Epub 2014 Sep 28.

Modulation of oligodendrocyte generation during a critical temporal window after NG2 cell division.

Author information

1
1] Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA. [2] Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
2
Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
4
1] Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA. [2] Connecticut Stem Cell Institute, University of Connecticut, Farmington, Connecticut, USA.

Abstract

Oligodendrocytes in the mammalian brain are continuously generated from NG2 cells throughout postnatal life. However, it is unclear when the decision is made for NG2 cells to self-renew or differentiate into oligodendrocytes after cell division. Using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo imaging and fate analysis of proliferated NG2 cells in fixed tissue, we demonstrate that in the postnatal developing mouse brain, the majority of divided NG2 cells differentiate into oligodendrocytes during a critical age-specific temporal window of 3-8 d. Notably, within this time period, damage to myelin and oligodendrocytes accelerated oligodendrocyte differentiation from divided cells, and whisker removal decreased the survival of divided cells in the deprived somatosensory cortex. These findings indicate that during the critical temporal window of plasticity, the fate of divided NG2 cells is sensitive to modulation by external signals.

PMID:
25262495
PMCID:
PMC4275302
DOI:
10.1038/nn.3815
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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