Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Jul 29;64(4):337-45. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.04.054.

Trends in acute myocardial infarction in young patients and differences by sex and race, 2001 to 2010.

Author information

1
Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
2
Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut; Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
3
St. Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, Missouri; University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri.
4
Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut.
5
Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; VA Center for Health Equity and Research Promotion, Philadelphia VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.
7
Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut.
8
Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut; Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Health Policy and Management, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. Electronic address: harlan.krumholz@yale.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Various national campaigns launched in recent years have focused on young women with acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs). Contemporary longitudinal data about sex differences in clinical characteristics, hospitalization rates, length of stay (LOS), and mortality have not been examined.

OBJECTIVES:

This study sought to determine sex differences in clinical characteristics, hospitalization rates, LOS, and in-hospital mortality by age group and race among young patients with AMIs using a large national dataset of U.S. hospital discharges.

METHODS:

Using the National Inpatient Sample, clinical characteristics, AMI hospitalization rates, LOS, and in-hospital mortality were compared for patients with AMI across ages 30 to 54 years, dividing them into 5-year subgroups from 2001 to 2010, using survey data analysis techniques.

RESULTS:

A total of 230,684 hospitalizations were identified with principal discharge diagnoses of AMI in 30- to 54-year-old patients from Nationwide Inpatient Sample data, representing an estimated 1,129,949 hospitalizations in the United States from 2001 to 2010. No statistically significant declines in AMI hospitalization rates were observed in the age groups <55 years or stratified by sex. Prevalence of comorbidities was higher in women and increased among both sexes through the study period. Women had longer LOS and higher in-hospital mortality than men across all age groups. However, observed in-hospital mortality declined significantly for women from 2001 to 2010 (from 3.3% to 2.3%, relative change 30.5%; p for trend < 0.0001) but not for men (from 2% to 1.8%, relative change 8.6%; p for trend = 0.60).

CONCLUSIONS:

AMI hospitalization rates for young people have not declined over the past decade. Young women with AMIs have more comorbidity, longer LOS, and higher in-hospital mortality than young men, although their mortality rates are decreasing.

KEYWORDS:

acute myocardial infarction; hospitalization; sex differences; trends; young women

PMID:
25060366
PMCID:
PMC4415523
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2014.04.054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center