Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Compr Psychiatry. 2014 Oct;55(7):1513-9. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2014.05.020. Epub 2014 Jun 9.

Comorbidity in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): a report from the International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS).

Author information

1
MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. Electronic address: cl2@sun.ac.za.
2
Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Department of Psychiatry (NAF), Queen Elizabeth II Hospital, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom; Postgraduate Medical School (NAF), University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, United Kingdom.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Milan, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
6
Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, South Africa.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Montefiore Medical Center University Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands; The Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, an Institute of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
9
Center for Genomic Sciences, Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México and Carracci Medical Group, Mexico City, Mexico.
10
Department of Psychiatry, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.
11
MRC Unit on Anxiety and Stress Disorders, Department of Psychiatry, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa; Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, University of Cape Town, South Africa.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is often associated with significant psychiatric comorbidity. Comorbid disorders include mood and anxiety disorders as well as obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders (OCSDs). This paper aims to investigate comorbidity of DSM Axis I-disorders, including OCSDs, in patients with OCD from 10 centers affiliated with the International College of Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Disorders (ICOCS).

METHODS:

This is a cross-sectional study of comorbidity of Axis I disorders including OCSDs in 457 outpatients with primary OCD (37% male; 63% female), with ages ranging from 12 to 88years (mean: 39.8±13). Treating clinicians assessed Axis I disorders using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview and assessed OCSDs using the Structured Clinical Interview for OCD related/spectrum disorders (SCID-OCSD).

RESULTS:

In terms of the OCSDs, highest comorbidity rates were found for tic disorder (12.5%), BDD (8.71%) and self-injurious behavior (7.43%). In terms of the other Axis I-disorders, major depressive disorder (MDD; 15%), social anxiety disorder (SAD; 14%), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; 13%) and dysthymic disorder (13%) were most prevalent.

DISCUSSION:

High comorbidity of some OCSDs in OCD supports the formal recognition of these conditions in a separate chapter of the nosology. Rates of other Axis I disorders are high in both the general population and in OCSDs, indicating that these may often also need to be the focus of intervention in OCD.

PMID:
25011690
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2014.05.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center