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Teach Learn Med. 2013;25(3):258-65. doi: 10.1080/10401334.2013.801773.

Teaching immigrant and refugee health to residents: domestic global health.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA. ramin.asgary@caa.columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Half a million immigrants enter the United States annually. Clinical providers generally lack training in immigrant health.

DESCRIPTION:

We developed a curriculum with didactic, clinical, and analytic components to advance residents' skills in immigrant and travel health. The curriculum focused on patients and their countries of origin and encompassed (a) societal, cultural, economical, and human rights profiles; (b) health system/ policies/resources/statistics, and environmental health; and (c) clinical manifestations, tropical and travel health. Residents evaluated sociocultural health beliefs and human rights abuses; performed history and physical examinations while precepted by faculty; developed specific care plans; and discussed patients in a dedicated immigrant health morning report.

EVALUATION:

We assessed resident satisfaction using questionnaires and focus groups. Residents (n=20) found clinical, sociocultural, and epidemiological components the most helpful. Morning reports reinforced peer education.

CONCLUSION:

The immigrant health curriculum was useful for residents. Multiple teaching modules, collaboration with grassroot organizations, and an ongoing clinical component were key features.

PMID:
23848334
DOI:
10.1080/10401334.2013.801773
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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