Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2014 Dec;29:88-95. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2014.06.004. Epub 2014 Jun 28.

Neuromodulation by acetylcholine: examples from schizophrenia and depression.

Author information

1
Dept. of Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, United States; Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, United States. Electronic address: michael.higley@yale.edu.
2
Dept. of Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, United States; Program in Cellular Neuroscience, Neurodegeneration and Repair, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, United States; Dept. of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, United States. Electronic address: marina.picciotto@yale.edu.

Abstract

The contribution of acetylcholine to psychiatric illnesses remains an area of active research. For example, increased understanding of mechanisms underlying cholinergic modulation of cortical function has provided insight into attentional dysfunction in schizophrenia. Acetylcholine normally enhances cortical sensitivity to external stimuli and decreases corticocortical communication, increasing focused attention; however, increases in ACh signaling can lead to symptoms related to anxiety and depression. For example, while stress-induced ACh release can result in adaptive responses to environmental stimuli, chronic elevations in cholinergic signaling may produce maladaptive behaviors. Here, we review several innovations in human imaging, molecular genetics and physiological control of circuits that have begun to identify mechanisms linking altered cholinergic neuromodulation to schizophrenia and depression.

PMID:
24983212
PMCID:
PMC4268065
DOI:
10.1016/j.conb.2014.06.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center