Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Dev Cell. 2014 Jun 9;29(5):547-61. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2014.04.021.

Mechanism of cytokinetic contractile ring constriction in fission yeast.

Author information

  • 1Department of Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA.
  • 2Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
  • 3Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Nanobiology Institute, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
  • 4Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA; Department of Cell Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520, USA.
  • 5Department of Chemical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA. Electronic address: bo8@columbia.edu.

Abstract

Cytokinesis involves constriction of a contractile actomyosin ring. The mechanisms generating ring tension and setting the constriction rate remain unknown because the organization of the ring is poorly characterized, its tension was rarely measured, and constriction is coupled to other processes. To isolate ring mechanisms, we studied fission yeast protoplasts, in which constriction occurs without the cell wall. Exploiting the absence of cell wall and actin cortex, we measured ring tension and imaged ring organization, which was dynamic and disordered. Computer simulations based on the amounts and biochemical properties of the key proteins showed that they spontaneously self-organize into a tension-generating bundle. Together with rapid component turnover, the self-organization mechanism continuously reassembles and remodels the constricting ring. Ring constriction depended on cell shape, revealing that the ring operates close to conditions of isometric tension. Thus, the fission yeast ring sets its own tension, but other processes set the constriction rate.

PMID:
24914559
PMCID:
PMC4137230
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2014.04.021
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center