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Physiol Behav. 2014 Sep;136:63-73. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.04.017. Epub 2014 Apr 13.

The neural signature of satiation is associated with ghrelin response and triglyceride metabolism.

Author information

1
Yale Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale Medical School, New Haven, CT, USA; John B. Pierce Laboratory, 290 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT, USA. Electronic address: xue.sun@yale.edu.
2
John B. Pierce Laboratory, 290 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale Medical School, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
John B. Pierce Laboratory, 290 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale Medical School, New Haven, CT, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Yale Medical School, New Haven, CT, USA.
6
Yale Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale Medical School, New Haven, CT, USA; John B. Pierce Laboratory, 290 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale Medical School, New Haven, CT, USA; Department of Psychology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA; Center for Excellence, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; Max-Planck Institute for Neurological Research, Cologne, Germany. Electronic address: dsmall@jbpierce.org.

Abstract

Eating behavior is guided by a complex interaction between signals conveying information about energy stores, food availability, and palatability. How peripheral signals regulate brain circuits that guide feeding during sensation and consumption of a palatable food is poorly understood. We used fMRI to measure brain response to a palatable food (milkshake) when n=32 participants were fasted and fed with either a fixed-portion or ad libitum meal. We found that larger post-prandial reductions in ghrelin and increases in triglycerides were associated with greater attenuation of response to the milkshake in brain regions regulating reward and feeding including the midbrain, amygdala, pallidum, hippocampus, insula and medial orbitofrontal cortex. Satiation-induced brain responses to milkshake were not related to acute changes in circulating insulin, glucose, or free fatty acids. The impact of a meal on the response to milkshake in the midbrain and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex differed depending upon whether meal termination was fixed or volitional, irrespective of the amount of food consumed. We conclude that satiation-induced changes in brain response to a palatable food are strongly and specifically associated with changes in circulating ghrelin and triglycerides and by volitional meal termination.

KEYWORDS:

Feeding; Ghrelin; Gut-brain axis; Satiation; Satiety; Triglycerides; fMRI

PMID:
24732416
PMCID:
PMC4195817
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2014.04.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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