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Psychiatry Res. 2014 Jan 30;221(1):58-62. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2013.10.007. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

A comparative diffusion tensor imaging study of corpus callosum subregion integrity in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, 155 Nanjing North Street, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, PR China.
2
Vanderbilt Neuroscience Graduate Program, Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt University, 465 21st Avenue South, Nashville, TN 37232, United States.
3
Department of Psychiatry, The First Hospital of China Medical University, 155 Nanjing North Street, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, PR China. Electronic address: kexu@vip.sina.com.
4
Department of Psychiatry, The First Hospital of China Medical University, 155 Nanjing North Street, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, PR China.
5
The Institute of Mental Health, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, PR China.
6
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, United States.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, United States.
8
Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, 155 Nanjing North Street, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, PR China. Electronic address: kexu@vip.sina.com.
9
Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, 155 Nanjing North Street, Shenyang 110001, Liaoning, PR China; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06511, United States. Electronic address: fei.wang@yale.edu.

Abstract

Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have provided evidence for corpus callosum (CC) white matter abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SZ). These findings include alterations in shape, volume, white matter intensity and structural integrity compared to healthy control populations. Although CC alterations are implicated in both SZ and BD, no study of which we are aware has investigated callosal subregion differences between these two patient populations. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess CC integrity in patients with BD (n=16), SZ (n=19) and healthy controls (HC) (n=24). Fractional anisotropy (FA) of CC subregions was measured using region of interest (ROI) analysis and compared in the three groups. Significant group differences of FA values were revealed in five CC subregions, including the anterior genu, middle genu, posterior genu, posterior body and anterior splenium. FA values of the same subregions were significantly reduced in patients with SZ compared with HC. FA values were also significantly reduced in patients with BD compared to the HC group in the same subregions, excepting the middle genu. No significant difference was found between patient groups in any region. Most of the alterations in CC subregions were present in both the BD and SZ groups. These results imply an overlap in potential pathology, possibly relating to risk factors common to both disorders. The one region that differed between patient groups, the middle genu area, may serve as an illness marker and is perhaps involved in the different cognitive impairments observed in BD and SZ.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorder; Corpus callosum; Diffusion tensor imaging; Fractional anisotropy; Schizophrenia

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