Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2014 May;22(5):E142-8. doi: 10.1002/oby.20617. Epub 2013 Oct 16.

Weight bias internalization, depression, and self-reported health among overweight binge eating disorder patients.

Author information

1
Yale University Department of Psychology, New Haven, Connecticut, 06520, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to examine the relationship between internalization of weight bias, which has been linked to specific negative mental health outcomes, and overall mental and physical health among overweight patients with binge eating disorder (BED). The role of depressive symptoms as a potential mediator in this relationship was also tested.

METHODS:

In a cross-sectional study, 255 individuals who were overweight and seeking treatment for BED completed the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS), Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI). Regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the relationship between the WBIS and the SF-36, and bootstrapping mediation analyses were conducted to test whether BDI scores mediated this relationship.

RESULTS:

Higher weight bias internalization was associated with poorer self-reported health on all scales of the SF-36, and BDI scores mediated the relationship. Additional analyses revealed that WBIS scores also mediated the relationship between BDI scores and three SF-36 scales.

CONCLUSIONS:

Weight bias internalization is associated with poorer overall mental and physical health, and depressive symptoms may play a role in accounting for this relationship in treatment-seeking overweight patients with BED.

PMID:
24039219
PMCID:
PMC3954963
DOI:
10.1002/oby.20617
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center