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J Cancer Educ. 2009;24(2):85-93. doi: 10.1080/08858190802664396.

Physician gender differences in general and cancer-specific prevention attitudes and practices.

Author information

1
Institute for Health Promotion Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The University of Texas Health Science Center, 8207 Callaghan Road, Suite 353, San Antonio, TX 78230, USA. ramirezag@uthscsa.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Findings are inconsistent regarding physician gender differences in general prevention practices and cancer-specific attitudes and practices.

METHODS:

We analyzed cross-sectional data from randomly selected physicians (N = 722) to test associations of gender with prevention practices and attitudes.

RESULTS:

Chi-square analyses (P < .05) showed gender differences for 14% (7/49) of the general and cancer-specific practices and attitudes tested. Multivariate analyses revealed that gender significantly (P < .05) predicted general prevention practices and cancer-specific attitudes in 4 models. Female gender predicted discussion of physical activity, violence, and use of substances. Male gender predicted belief in effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen screening.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, male and female physicians showed more similarities than differences, but physician gender was associated with a number of important general and cancer-specific prevention services. Female physicians were more likely to discuss general health prevention activities than male physicians, especially issues considered sensitive. We discuss implications for research and education.

PMID:
19431022
PMCID:
PMC4039198
DOI:
10.1080/08858190802664396
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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