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Compr Psychiatry. 2013 Oct;54(7):1077-81. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2013.04.017. Epub 2013 Jun 14.

Examining the relationship between food thought suppression and binge eating disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208098, New Haven, CT 06520-8098, USA. Electronic address: Rachel.Barnes@yale.edu.

Abstract

Food thought suppression, or purposely attempting to avoid thoughts of food, is related to a number of unwanted eating- and weight-related consequences, particularly in dieting and obese individuals. Little is known about the possible significance of food thought suppression in clinical samples, particularly obese patients who binge eat. This study examined food thought suppression in 150 obese patients seeking treatment for binge eating disorder (BED). Food thought suppression was not associated with binge eating frequency or body mass index but was significantly associated with higher current levels of eating disorder psychopathology and variables pertaining to obesity, dieting, and binge eating.

PMID:
23751246
PMCID:
PMC3779532
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2013.04.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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