Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Sep;21(9):1759-63. doi: 10.1002/oby.20195. Epub 2013 May 13.

Shift-and-persist: a protective factor for elevated BMI among low-socioeconomic-status children.

Author information

1
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA; CARE: Community Alliance for Research and Engagement, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Low socioeconomic status (SES) is associated with many adverse health outcomes, including childhood overweight and obesity. However, little is understood about why some children defy this trend by maintaining a healthy weight despite living in obesogenic environments. The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the psychological strategy of "shift-and-persist" protects low-SES children from overweight and obesity. Shift-and-persist involves dealing with stressors by reframing them more positively while at the same time persisting in optimistic thoughts about the future.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

Middle school children (N = 1,523, ages 9-15) enrolled in a school-based obesity prevention trial completed health surveys and physical assessments. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to examine the role of SES, shift-and-persist strategies, and their interaction on BMI z-scores, while controlling for student race/ethnicity, gender, and reported diet and physical activity.

RESULTS:

Among children reporting engaging in less frequent shift-and-persist strategies, lower SES was associated with significantly higher BMI z-scores (P < 0.05). However, among children reporting engaging in more frequent shift-and-persist strategies, there was no association of SES with BMI z-score (P = 0.16), suggesting that shift-and-persist strategies may be protective against the association between SES and BMI.

CONCLUSIONS:

Interventions aimed at improving psychological resilience among children of low SES may provide a complementary approach to prevent childhood overweight and obesity among at-risk populations.

PMID:
23671041
PMCID:
PMC4325991
DOI:
10.1002/oby.20195
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center