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J Relig Health. 2002 Winter;41(4):333-346.

Are Religious Women More Likely to Have Breast Cancer Screening?

Author information

1
Peter Van News is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Epidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is also a Lecturer in Chronic Disease Epidemiology teaching a course entitled "Religion, Health, and Society." Prior to coming to Yale Dr. Van Ness was a professor of the philosophy of religion at Union Theological Seminary and Columbia University in New York City. Stanislav V. Kasl, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Chronic Disease Epidemiology Division of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the Yale University School of Medicine. Beth A. Jones, M.P.H., Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Chronic Disease Epidemiology Division of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the Yale University School of Medicine.

Abstract

The study objective was to investigate whether women who frequently attend religious services are more likely to have breast cancer screening-mammography and clinical breast examinations-than other women. Multivariate logistic regression models show that white women who attended religious services frequently had more than twice the odds of breast cancer screening than white women who attended less frequently (Odds Ratio (OR) = 2.61; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 1.12, 6.06). The behavior of white women was different from African American women (religious attendance-race interaction term p-value = 0.008); African American women who attended religious services frequently were possibly less likely to have breast cancer screening (OR 0.49; CI = 0.19-1.31).

PMID:
23293394
PMCID:
PMC3537169

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