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J Neurosci. 2012 Sep 19;32(38):12990-8.

The relationship between working memory storage and elevated activity as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA. riggall@wisc.edu

Abstract

Does the sustained, elevated neural activity observed during working memory tasks reflect the short-term retention of information? Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of delayed recognition of visual motion in human participants were analyzed with two methods: a general linear model (GLM) and multivoxel pattern analysis. Although the GLM identified sustained, elevated delay-period activity in superior and lateral frontal cortex and in intraparietal sulcus, pattern classifiers were unable to recover trial-specific stimulus information from these delay-active regions. The converse-no sustained, elevated delay-period activity but successful classification of trial-specific stimulus information-was true of posterior visual regions, including area MT+ (which contains both middle temporal area and medial superior temporal area) and calcarine and pericalcarine cortex. In contrast to stimulus information, pattern classifiers were able to extract trial-specific task instruction-related information from frontal and parietal areas showing elevated delay-period activity. Thus, the elevated delay-period activity that is measured with fMRI may reflect processes other than the storage, per se, of trial-specific stimulus information. It may be that the short-term storage of stimulus information is represented in patterns of (statistically) "subthreshold" activity distributed across regions of low-level sensory cortex that univariate methods cannot detect.

PMID:
22993416
PMCID:
PMC3470886
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1892-12.2012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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