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PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2012;6(8):e1796. doi: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0001796. Epub 2012 Aug 21.

Potential for rabies control through dog vaccination in wildlife-abundant communities of Tanzania.

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1
Division of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America. meagan.fitzpatrick@yale.edu

Abstract

Canine vaccination has been successful in controlling rabies in diverse settings worldwide. However, concerns remain that coverage levels which have previously been sufficient might be insufficient in systems where transmission occurs both between and within populations of domestic dogs and other carnivores. To evaluate the effectiveness of vaccination targeted at domestic dogs when wildlife also contributes to transmission, we applied a next-generation matrix model based on contract tracing data from the Ngorongoro and Serengeti Districts in northwest Tanzania. We calculated corresponding values of R(0), and determined, for policy purposes, the probabilities that various annual vaccination targets would control the disease, taking into account the empirical uncertainty in our field data. We found that transition rate estimates and corresponding probabilities of vaccination-based control indicate that rabies transmission in this region is driven by transmission within domestic dogs. Different patterns of rabies transmission between the two districts exist, with wildlife playing a more important part in Ngorongoro and leading to higher recommended coverage levels in that district. Nonetheless, our findings indicate that an annual dog vaccination campaign achieving the WHO-recommended target of 70% will control rabies in both districts with a high level of certainty. Our results support the feasibility of controlling rabies in Tanzania through dog vaccination.

PMID:
22928056
PMCID:
PMC3424251
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0001796
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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