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J Gen Intern Med. 2013 Jan;28(1):82-90. doi: 10.1007/s11606-012-2189-z. Epub 2012 Aug 16.

Receipt of opioid analgesics by HIV-infected and uninfected patients.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, PO Box 208093, New Haven, CT 06520-8088, USA. ejennifer.edelman@yale.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Opioids are increasingly prescribed, but there are limited data on opioid receipt by HIV status.

OBJECTIVES:

To describe patterns of opioid receipt by HIV status and the relationship between HIV status and receiving any, high-dose, and long-term opioids.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional analysis of the Veterans Aging Cohort Study.

PARTICIPANTS:

HIV-infected (HIV+) patients receiving Veterans Health Administration care, and uninfected matched controls.

MAIN MEASURES:

Pain-related diagnoses were determined using ICD-9 codes. Any opioid receipt was defined as at least one opioid prescription; high-dose was defined as an average daily dose ≥ 120 mg of morphine equivalents; long-term opioids was defined as ≥ 90 consecutive days, allowing a 30 day refill gap. Multivariable models were used to assess the relationship between HIV infection and the three outcomes.

KEY RESULTS:

Among the HIV+ (n = 23,651) and uninfected (n = 55,097) patients, 31 % of HIV+ and 28 % of uninfected (p < 0.001) received opioids. Among patients receiving opioids, HIV+ patients were more likely to have an acute pain diagnosis (7 % vs. 4 %), but less likely to have a chronic pain diagnosis (53 % vs. 69 %). HIV+ patients received a higher mean daily morphine equivalent dose than uninfected patients (41 mg vs. 37 mg, p = 0.001) and were more likely to receive high-dose opioids (6 % vs. 5 %, p < 0.001). HIV+ patients received fewer days of opioids than uninfected patients (median 44 vs. 60, p < 0.001), and were less likely to receive long-term opioids (31 % vs. 34 %, p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, HIV+ status was associated with receipt of any opioids (AOR 1.40, 95 % CI 1.35, 1.46) and high-dose opioids (AOR 1.22, 95 % CI 1.07, 1.39), but not long-term opioids (AOR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.88, 1.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with HIV infection are more likely to be prescribed opioids than uninfected individuals, and there is a variable association with pain diagnoses. Efforts to standardize approaches to pain management may be warranted in this highly complex and vulnerable patient population.

PMID:
22895747
PMCID:
PMC3539026
DOI:
10.1007/s11606-012-2189-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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